Lost Bride Research Day 24

Wednesday
Not much has been happening while I wait for the FOIA e-mail from the Kalamazoo County Sheriff. Then this afternoon I get a call from the Sheriff’s office to tell me that I owe them $13.02 for the FOIA that was processed by their attorney. Didn’t I get the e-mail from their attorney? Nope, nothing in my inbox or spam folder. “Oh, she must have mailed it.” Mailed what – the invoice? “Wait until Friday and if you still don’t get it, call me back.”

Ah, the mail is here. Let’s see if I got anything from the Sheriff. If nothing, I’ll call them today, I’m not waiting till Friday.

Nothing from the Sheriff. I am on the phone right now with the records division asking for help. Even if the attorney mailed the information, it just doesn’t take over a week to get a letter from one side of town to the other.
The records clerk said that the attorney left a message on my voice mail. (Uh, no message left for me.) At any rate, the clerk said that “downtown” will send “it” back to them and I can go in to the Lake Street location and pay and get the info right away. I am roll’n!

Of course, I arrived right in the middle of their 12:30-1:30 lunch hour. I went and got myself a diet soda and came back and got in line again. No idea how many people-if any- are in front of me. There’s about 10 other people in the waiting room.

Turns out that there was only one person ahead of me so I was sent back to the records room very quickly. As I walked thru the door, the clerk reached under the counter and pulled out the file.
“How did you know that was for me?” I asked.
The clerk smiled and said “We know who you are.”
Really? I’m not sure if that is good or bad.

The clerk said I could look through the file so that if I had any questions they could address them for me right away. I looked at the cover letter from the county attorney and said “so this is just about everything that you had redacted from the file?” Yes, that was correct. “Were you able to furnish a mug shot?” The clerk replied that it was the last page. When I flipped to it I saw the face of the woman I had seen in the newspaper article a week or so earlier. I said, kind of half to myself “Yeah, that’s our girl.”

The clerk looked at me as she was filling out my receipt and said “So, how did you know her?”

“I didn’t.”